Jewish Atheist

An agnostic atheist perspective
from a once orthodox Jew.
choseyourwayoflife:

I have a message for Germany. That you are all going to die. on We Heart It.

Most Germans today are absolutely ashamed of the country’s Nazi past. So how about directing the message to Nazis - wherever they live…

choseyourwayoflife:

I have a message for Germany. That you are all going to die. on We Heart It.

Most Germans today are absolutely ashamed of the country’s Nazi past. So how about directing the message to Nazis - wherever they live…

wenevergotusedtoegypt:

The problem with the assertion often posted in the Judaism tag (by people who for some reason think followers of that tag will care) that you don’t need religion to determine morals and if you can’t determine morals on your own you lack empathy, not religion, is that (a) Judaism 100% acknowledges that the category of laws known as mishpatim are things that humanity could figure out on our own without religion and (b) the mishpatim don’t cover all the laws, and there are many that we would NOT be able to arrive at based on our own logic no matter HOW much empathy we would ever have, because some laws (which are nevertheless morally correct to follow) are suprarational.

1) Could you give some examples of such laws?

2) How do you know they’re suprarational? (and perhaps elaborate on what you mean by that.)

3) How do you know they’re moral? How are you defining “moral”?

This is kind of what I see when super young frummies approach me to talk about being religious, lol

This is kind of what I see when super young frummies approach me to talk about being religious, lol

(via kevin-bacon-casserole)

teded:


In 479 BC, when Persian soldiers beseiged the Greek city of Potidaea, the tide retreated much farther than usual, leaving a convenient invasion route. But this wasn’t a stroke of luck. Before they had crossed halfway, the water returned in a wave higher than anyone had ever seen, drowning the attackers. The Potiidaeans believed they had been saved by the wrath of Poseidon. But what really saved them was likely the same phenomenon that has destroyed countless others: a tsunami.


From the TED-Ed Lesson How tsunamis work - Alex Gendler
Animation by Augenblick Studios



Maybe the Israelites leaving Egypt owe Poseidon some gratitude for drowning the Egyptians.

teded:

In 479 BC, when Persian soldiers beseiged the Greek city of Potidaea, the tide retreated much farther than usual, leaving a convenient invasion route. But this wasn’t a stroke of luck. Before they had crossed halfway, the water returned in a wave higher than anyone had ever seen, drowning the attackers. The Potiidaeans believed they had been saved by the wrath of Poseidon. But what really saved them was likely the same phenomenon that has destroyed countless others: a tsunami.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How tsunamis work - Alex Gendler

Animation by Augenblick Studios

Maybe the Israelites leaving Egypt owe Poseidon some gratitude for drowning the Egyptians.

(via bluejewofzsouchmuhn)

Question for the Ladies

You probably heard that report recently that storms with female names are perceived by the public as less dangerous, and so cause more fatalities - so, as such, do you think we should switch to only male names (therefore helping the public to take the threats more seriously and avoiding more deaths) or do we keep the female names, in the name of promoting gender equality, even though it may cause more deaths (at least in the short run)?

racheladler asked: Aside from his historical errors with Shavuot, that rabbi's depiction of relationships is crazy. "Like a newly engaged couple that says yes to each other's every request without asking questions." ?!?!?! Who has a relationship like that? It's not even healthy. Not to mention, if this is actually a marriage, it's FILLED with passive aggression and is pretty friggin' abusive. OY.

soooooooooooooooooooooo true!!!

eretzyisrael:

What is Shavuot Really About?

A wedding celebration between G-d and the Jewish People - by Rabbi Tzvi Sytner

1) I still can’t believe that I went to yeshiva with this guy… so sad.

2) Compare his theological questions and answers with anthropological ones; to me, this only highlights how narrowminded the ‘intellectualism’ of yeshivas really is, bc, honestly, who in yeshiva is actually looking for objective data on the sources of these traditions? Who is studying how they’ve evolved over time? Almost no-one, and I’m sure a great many would object to the very idea. So, instead, they wax pseudo-philosophical apologetics based on mistaken assumptions and end up with comforting but almost entirely inaccurate answers:

Elon Gilad writes in Ha’aretz:

…Shavuot has its origins in the ancient mid-summer harvest celebrations of the Canaanites, the ancient people from which Israelite society sprang during the Bronze Age. These early religions’ celebrations, in which revelers rejoiced in the harvesting of wheat, were local affairs probably celebrated in communal threshing grounds, where the wheat was separated from the chaff, and other cultic sites.

All that started to change in the 7th and 8th centuries BCE, when the Jerusalem monarchs and priesthood consolidated power, bringing formerly separate tribes under the helm of one ruler. As part of this program, they co-opted these local affairs and supplanted them by unified rites that could only be preformed in the Temple in Jerusalem. This program would create a sense of peoplehood for the people of the land and enrich the coffers of both palace and Temple.…

[D]uring the First Temple period, Shavuot was an appendage to Passover, the first of the two major agricultural holidays. Shavuot marked the end of the festival (Atzeret) of the 50-day period called the Omer, between the harvest of barley – Passover - and the harvest of wheat. Sukkot, the second agricultural holiday, involves the same pattern, in this case with a seven-day period between the start of the holiday and the Atzeret.

Since Shavuot is not a holiday in its own right, according to the Bible, we don’t actually know the exact date of the celebration, only that it comes 50 days after Passover

It doesn’t have a set name either - it is cited as The Festival of Weeks (Exodus 34:22, Deuteronomy 16:10), The Festival of Reaping (Exodus 23:16) and The Day of First Fruits (Numbers 28:26).

It was the rabbis of the first decades after the destruction of the Temple who changed the significance of Shavuot and proclaimed that Atzeret, as they called it, was the celebration of the giving of the Torah to Moses on Mount Sinai.

… From the 2nd century on, Shavuot began to focus on the Torah.…[F]ew traditions were assigned to Shavuot during late antiquity (after 70 CE) and the early Middle Ages. This began to change during the Middle Ages, however. This is when traditions such as the act of decorating synagogues with greenery first became associated with Shavuot [as did the eating of dairy products]…

An even later tradition to become associated with Shavuot is that of all-night Torah study sessions. The tradition started in the 16th century by Rabbi Joseph Caro [author of the Shulkhan Arukh]. Later, under the influence of the Kabbalah revolution of the Ari, these were dubbed “Tikkun Leil Shavuot,” which is what they are called to this very day.…

- Quoted from FailedMessiah

For all the firstborn among the children of Israel are Mine whether man or beast since the day I smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt; I have sanctified them for Myself.

Bamidbar [Numbers] 8:17 (via torahverse)

Yeah, this makes a lot of sense. Real good illustration of religious logic.

precutting toilet paper for the fam… bc that’s what moses would have done.
(who am I kidding, the israelites obviously set aside leaves before shabbos and yomtov. of course.)

precutting toilet paper for the fam… bc that’s what moses would have done.

(who am I kidding, the israelites obviously set aside leaves before shabbos and yomtov. of course.)

With the fam for the holidays… wish me luck…

Anonymous asked: Sorry if I offended you, I've also suffered from depression and I'm an Atheist, but I was just sayin'

ahh, I see. well I appreciate the message, but yeah, stereotyping your own can still harm and offend your own. something to keep in mind. cheers

Anonymous asked: Sorry for your depression. Sunshine and physical activity are very important. Start a Garden. I really like your tumblr and it inspired me to start a blog. See a Doctor and consider what you are eating and drinking. Hope U get well - altercocker jewish atheist

thanks alter =]